We Need To Talk About Putin

dxvi7j9wkaax5jc

Money? Ego? Power? His KGB background? I grapple with what makes Russia’s master tick and the myths around him in my book with Ebury Publishing, an imprint of Penguin Random House. With the February 2019 launch of We Need To Talk About Putin, this page will be a place to consolidate news, reviews, launch events and information about foreign editions.

Oops

I don’t know how many times I read the text. I, the copy editor, and the two other readers who looked over it failed to pick up that, on p. 24, I mix up Macedonia and Montenegro. My apologies to both countries, and we’ll make sure this is fixed in reprints and the translations.

Official Pages

Penguin Random House UK

Reviews

In The Times, it is the ‘Book of the Week.’ Edward Lucas calls it “pithy,” sketching “a bleak, but convincing picture of the man in the Kremlin and the political system that he dominates” and “Galeotti writes convincingly about the fin-de-siècle atmosphere hanging over the Kremlin.”

Says Vin Arthey in The Scotsman“The Western media present an image of Vladimir Putin that makes him seem like a Bond villain, an evil genius who is playing with the fate of the world. In this dynamic, authoritative and often witty book, Mark Galeotti deftly defuses this myth.” He adds that it’s a “real page-turner.”

The Times has named it as one of the Best Books of 2019.

Alex Nice, for Chatham Housecalls it “a punchy corrective to the simplistic caricatures so often deployed to describe Putin and the system he presides over.”

In The GuardianDaniel Beer says “Mark Galeotti, in We Need to Talk About Putin, has distilled a great deal of research and thought into a slim and engaging volume that reads like a primer for anyone poised to enter a negotiation with the Russian president.”

“With an impressive academic record, [Galeotti] does not shrink from original, non-conformist views” says Raymond van den Boogaard in the Dutch Review of Books.

“Mark Galeotti’s highly recommended We Need to Talk About Putin (Penguin / Ebury, 2019) is a wonderfully compressed book that punctures our lazy preconceptions about Russia. Robust, reasonable and addictive, it should be read by anyone who wonders whether there’s more to Vladimir Putin than our politicians seem to think” according to Cambridge’s Dr Mark Smith on his excellent blog, Beyond the Kremlin.

Launch Events

HowTo Academy, London, 18 February 2019

Interviews and Articles

Interviewed in The Observer on “on why the west misreads Putin, Trump’s election, the Skripals and why he loathes Game of Thrones,” I also note that we make the mistake of treating Putin too seriously, giving him a geopolitical weight he doesn’t deserve; indeed, we should sometimes laugh more than recoil in horror. This of course provides the headline “Mark Galeotti: ‘We should laugh at Russia more'” that Russian and Ukrainian sources pick up on, with various degree of wilful misunderstanding of my point…

Interviewed in Wiener Zeitungon Russian meddling, the mythology of Putin, and why Russian politics are actually more complex and varied, even in some limited ways more democratic than most people seem to assume.

Interviewed in The New Internationalistin which I suggest that “Historians will look back at Putin as a transitional figure and his regime likewise.”

Interviewed in the War College podcast, to “dispel myths and set the record straightish” on Putin.

Foreign Translations

Czech: Paseka

Dutch: Prometheus

Slovak: IKAR

%d bloggers like this: