New Book: Combat Vehicles of Russia’s Special Forces

Update (11 May 2020): I have just received my author’s copies, so this is definitely still on track to come out on 28 May 2020 – some photos of inside pages are below. On a less positive note, a mix-up led to a mis-identification of a GAZ Tigr for a Taifun-K on one photo on page 45. Sadly, these things happen.

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Admittedly, a touch more recondite than A Short History of Russia, but my next book from Osprey, due out in May, will be Combat Vehicles of Russia’s Special Forces, now available for pre-order. Given that I am not a tech-head, and that this covers a whole range of vehicles rather than a single design or line, instead of the detailed discussion of engines, fire control systems and gun types some of the New Vanguard series features, this is much more of a tour around the various specialist vehicles employed today, from quad-bikes to air-droppable mini-tanks, and what it says about Russian military (and Rosgvardiya) intent and capabilities. (There’s also some speculation about future designs, like the Naval Infantry’s new marine assault vehicle.)

Of course, as you can see from the above compound on one of his preliminary sketches and the final, it has the usual great art, this time by Adam Hook, as well as lots of photos, including many from the incomparable Vitaly Kuzmin.

Here’s the blurb:

Elite forces need elite vehicles. As Vladimir Putin has devoted effort and funds into modernising Russia’s armed forces and turning them into an instrument geared not just for defending the Motherland but also projecting power beyond its borders, Russia has seen a growing emphasis on special and specialist forces. Traditionally, the elite Spetsnaz commandos had to make do with regular vehicles or civilian-based ‘technicals’, not least to conceal their presence (or, indeed, very existence). Now, increasingly at the forefront of Russian power projection, the Spetsnaz are acquiring more capable, versatile vehicles, such as the paratroopers’ BTR-D personnel carrier, and also experimenting with exotic, specialist new acquisitions, such as the Chaborz M-3 buggy and Yamaha Grizzly all-terrain vehicle.

The other elite branches of Russia’s forces, such as the Arctic-warfare troops of the 200th Independent Motor Rifle Brigade, the paratroopers of the Air Assault Troops (VDV), the Naval Infantry, and the elite units of the security forces are also developing and fielding new vehicles for their specialist roles, from combat snowmobiles to urban-warfare vehicles. From highly-mobile LMVs able to operate in the deserts of Syria or the streets of Ukraine, through dedicated fire-support vehicles such as the air-droppable Sprut-SD or the massive BMPT ‘Terminator’, to amphibious tanks and drone-equipped security trucks, these are the workhorses of Russia’s special forces. This study explores all these combat vehicles in detail, combining expert analysis from Russia expert Mark Galeotti with highly accurate full-colour illustrations and photographs.

Contents

Introduction
The Spetsnaz: Whatever They Need
The Airborne Troops: By Air and Land
The Naval Infantry: Finding Their Sea Legs
Specialised Forces: War and Peacekeeping
Security Forces: Hurricanes And Punishers
Prospects For The Future
Further Reading
Index

 

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5 Comments

  1. Salvaire Paul

     /  February 19, 2020

    Pre-ordered from Osprey’s. Thanks for your newsletter.

    Paul Salvaire

    >

    Reply
  2. Mark: The recent articles in Moscow Times have been excellent. ! Cheers !! ROBERT ECKART

    On Tue, Feb 18, 2020 at 3:27 AM In Moscow’s Shadows wrote:

    > Mark Galeotti posted: ” Admittedly, a touch more recondite than A Short > History of Russia, but my next book from Osprey, due out in May, will be > Combat Vehicles of Russia’s Special Forces, now available for pre-order. > Given that I am not a tech-head, and that this covers a who” >

    Reply
  3. Salvaire Paul

     /  April 8, 2020

    Hi. Will this book be released on schedule, unlike the Short History of Russia ?

    Reply

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